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How Coronavirus Changed the Life of Ukrainian Capital (PHOTOS)
22 March, 2020
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Kyiv residents wear medical masks for protection inside a tram in the Podil neighborhood in Kyiv, Ukraine on March 20. Anastasia Vlasova / hromadske

The Ukrainian capital Kyiv has now survived almost a week without its underground transport system. From March 23, even more travel restrictions will be in place here with bus, tram, and shuttle bus journeys terminated for all Kyivans apart from those that ensure critically important life areas (such as healthcare and groceries).

READ MORE: Full Transport Lockdown in Kyiv as of March 23

The metro was closed due to the quarantine in the country and to prevent mass gatherings of people. Social distancing, which according to doctors and health workers is key for warding off Covid-19, requires humans to stay at least 1.5 meters apart.

Kyivans wait for the arrival of a bus in the Podil neighborhood in Kyiv, Ukraine on March 20. Photo: Anastasia Vlasova / Hromadske

Kyivans wait for the arrival of a bus in the Podil neighborhood in Kyiv, Ukraine on March 20. Photo: Anastasia Vlasova / Hromadske

But many Ukrainians still need to physically show up at their work places as the quarantine rules, although recommend working from home, do not make it compulsory and companies are free to choose whether to set up remote work processes, demand workers show up, or send them on unpaid leave. In the most extreme cases, Ukrainians even lost their jobs.

READ MORE: “Coronavirus Took My Job”: People Who Lost Their Jobs During the Quarantine

A municipal vehicle washes the roads near the Kontraktova Ploshcha metro station in Kyiv, Ukraine on March 20. Photo: Anastasia Vlasova / Hromadske

Kyivans wait for the arrival of a bus in the Podil neighborhood in Kyiv, Ukraine on March 20. Photo: Anastasia Vlasova / Hromadske

Kyivans wait for the arrival of a bus in the Podil neighborhood in Kyiv, Ukraine on March 20. Photo: Anastasia Vlasova / Hromadske

For those who need to be in the office, the only way to get there, unless it's a walkable distance, is by buses, trams, shuttle buses, and taxi. The closure of the metro led to the formation of unprecedented lines at bus stops, especially during the morning and evening rush hours.

The police and National Guard presence has increased due to the quarantine. Photo: Anastasia Vlasova / Hromadske

Passengers are allowed to enter the bus one by one but no more than 10 people on a bus. The process is controlled by a police officer. Kyiv, Ukraine, March 20. Photo: Anastasia Vlasova / Hromadske

Those who "failed to make it" to the bus now have to wait for the next one to arrive. Kyiv, Ukraine, March 20. Photo: Anastasia Vlasova / Hromadske

Shopping malls, entertainment centers, and cinemas were closed down due to the quarantine, too. Many cafes and restaurants strengthened their takeaway and delivery services in a bid to reduce financial losses. But supermarkets and grocery stores remain open, as well as pharmacies, gas stations, and banks.

Some Kyivans wear medical masks but many don't. Kyiv, Ukraine, March 20. Photo: Anastasia Vlasova / Hromadske

Churches retain their services, albeit churchgoers are advised against kissing icons – an Orthodox tradition.

A lot of cafes still offer takeaway services. Kyiv, Ukraine, March 20. Photo: Anastasia Vlasova / Hromadske

Pensioners lining up to receive payments keeps distance of at least 1 meter apart. Kyiv, Ukraine, March 20. Photo: Anastasia Vlasova / Hromadske

It is high time for food delivery services in Kyiv. Many of them can barely manage to carry out their orders. Kyiv, Ukraine, March 20. Photo: Anastasia Vlasova / Hromadske

A woman carries a parcel in Kyiv, Ukraine on March 20. It is business as usual for mail delivery services. Photo: Anastasia Vlasova / Hromadske

Grocery stores are among the very few things that are allowed to stay open in Kyiv, Ukraine due to the quarantine. There is plenty of food available in each of them, there are no shortages. March 20. Photo: Anastasia Vlasova / Hromadske

Clothes stores and shopping malls are shut down until at least April 3. Kyiv, Ukraine, March 20. Photo: Anastasia Vlasova / Hromadske

The authorities, both national and local, advise Ukrainians to stay at home and not go outside unless absolutely necessary. The recommended pastime includes reading, watching films and series, speaking with close ones.

Some people wear buffs instead of medical masks. Kyiv, Ukraine, March 20. Photo: Anastasia Vlasova / Hromadske

Churches remain open and services go ahead, yet visitors are asked not to kiss icons (an Orthodox tradition) and share spoons for communion. Kyiv, Ukraine, March 20. Photo: Anastasia Vlasova / Hromadske

Meanwhile, healthcare workers, police officers, and employees of the critically important for city life companies work as usual.

Two Kyivan dog owners chill in a park in the Podil neighborhood in Kyiv, Ukraine on March 20. Photo: Anastasia Vlasova / Hromadske

While kindergartens are under quarantine, kids on playgrounds are asked to keep distance apart. Kyiv, Ukraine, March 20. Photo: Anastasia Vlasova / Hromadske

Covid-19 is not transmitted through air, so going for a walk, if all the necessary precautionary measures are taken, should not harm. Kyiv, Ukraine, March 20. Photo: Anastasia Vlasova / Hromadske

To increase their immune system and health, some Kyivans work out outdoors. Kyiv, Ukraine, March 20. Photo: Anastasia Vlasova / Hromadske

The Ukrainian Health Ministry has stated that the quarantine will be extended if Ukraine sees an increase in coronavirus cases. As of 11 p.m. Kyiv time on March 20, Ukraine has 41 confirmed cases.

Schools have also closed until April 3, so parents come up with ways to entertain their children indoors and outdoors. Kyiv, Ukraine, March 20. Photo: Anastasia Vlasova / Hromadske

There's an increased police presence in Kyiv due to the quarantine. Kyiv, Ukraine, March 20. Photo: Anastasia Vlasova / Hromadske

A woman walks a dog in the Podil neighborhood in Kyiv, Ukraine on March 20. Photo: Anastasia Vlasova / Hromadske

Some street vendors still sell food produce in the Podil neighborhood in Kyiv, Ukraine on March 20. Photo: Anastasia Vlasova / Hromadske 

A tram carries passengers in the Podil neighborhood in Kyiv, Ukraine on March 20. Photo: Anastasia Vlasova / Hromadske ​

READ MORE: Coronavirus in Ukraine: Confirmed Cases So Far (UPDATING)

/By Anastasia Vlasova

/Translated by Maria Romanenko