UARU
Why Ukraine’s National Television Is in Trouble
8 November, 2016
438

What You Need To Know:

 

 The resignation of Zurab Alasania, the Director General of the National Television Company of Ukraine, was an unexpected yet calculated move to draw attention to the sorry state of Ukrainian public media

 

✅  According to Ihor Rozkladay, an attorney at the Media Law Institute, Alasania and his colleagues were tired and had spent the last two years fighting the old soviet bureaucracy

 

✅  Ihor Rozkladay: ‘It’s difficult to do something quickly with this very huge, very difficult machine’

 

✅  Ihor Rozkladay:  ‘In this country, you don’t need to cover the whole population. You don’t need to have huge ratings.’

 
The resignation of Zurab Alasania, the Director General of Ukrainian National Television, was an unexpected yet calculated move to draw attention to the sorry state of Ukrainian public media. Specifically, Alasania alleged that the government had placed pressure on his channel after running investigative reports into corruption. He also complained that the government was financing next year's Eurovision by cutting into his channel's budget.
 

According to Ihor Rozkladay, an attorney at the Media Law Institute, Alasania and his colleagues were tired and had spent the last two years fighting the old soviet bureaucracy.

 

Read - Open Letter: How Ukraine's Public Broadcasting Reform is Being Sabotaged

 

In April 2014, a new law on Public Television and Radio Broadcasting was adopted as part of the reform on public broadcasting. Alasania’s resignation could slow down the process. “It’s difficult to do something quickly with this very huge, very difficult machine”, says Rozkladay.

 

A broadcasting watchdog Detector Media recently stated that the First National TV channel had less than 1% of viewership under Alasania’s direction in 2015. Rozkladay responded by arguing that “in this country, you don’t need to cover the whole population. You don’t need to have a huge rating.”

 

Hromadske’s Josh Kovensky and Tamara Rozuvan spoke to Ihor Rozkladay, an attorney at the Media Law Institute during Hromadske's live broadcast of The Sunday Show on November 6, 2016, in Kyiv.