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Prosecutor's Office accuses 5 Russian service members and 3 Wagner mercenaries of killing civilians in Kyiv Oblast
24 May, 2022
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Wagner Group mercenaries and Russian service members who committed crimes in Kyiv Oblast Prosecutor General's Office of Ukraine

Prosecutor General's Office of Ukraine accuses 5 Russian service members and 3 members of Wagner private military company of killing the head of the village of Motyzhyn in Kyiv Oblast and her family. They were reported the suspicion in absentia of violating the laws or customs of war combined with premeditated murder.


According to the investigation, the suspects robbed civilians, tortured, killed, and burned their houses during the occupation of Kyiv Oblast, which started in early February and lasted in March. The suspects are charged with 14 episodes of violent treatment of civilians. Only three people survived their torture.

The Prosecutor's Office says that in March 2022, the Russian military and Wagner mercenaries came to the home of Olha Sukhenko, the head of the village Motyzhyn, kidnapped Olha, her husband, and son. The occupiers tortured prisoners in an attempt to obtain information about the Armed Forces of Ukraine and Territorial Defence.

Investigators report that the son's leg was shot before Olha eyes, then the boy was shot in the head. Olha's husband was tortured in a similar way. The whole family died from numerous gunshot wounds.

Prosecutors also identified another victim, a civilian woman who was shot dead by Russian troops because she was wearing dark clothes. Her father was then taken prisoner and kept for a long time on a farm with his eyes closed and his hands tied without water or food.

The suspects are also accused of torturing two members of the public organization Patriot to death. Their bodies were found with numerous penetrating gunshot wounds.

In addition, the occupiers detained two volunteers who were trying to transport humanitarian aid to Motyzhyn. According to the Prosecutor's Office, after interrogations and torture, they were taken to a forest and were ordered to flee — occupiers then opened fire on their backs. One of the volunteers died from a headshot wound, and the other was wounded. The Russians stole cars and humanitarian aid.

They also tied the hands of another victim to a quad bike and forced him to run almost a kilometer. After interrogations, death threats, and beatings, he was kept in a sewage pit for several days.

Suspected Russians:

  • Senior Lieutenant Oleg Krikunov - Commander of Platoon of the 37th Separate Guards Motor Rifle Brigade;
  • Sergeant Genghis Gonchikov - Commander of Department and the combat vehicle of the 37th Separate Guards Motor Rifle Brigade;
  • Sergeant Alexander Vanchikov - Commander of Division of the 37th Separate Guards Motor Rifle Brigade;
  • Sergeant Magomedmirza Suleymanov - Commander of the combat vehicle of the 37th Separate Guards Motor Rifle Brigade;
  • Senior Lieutenant Vitaliy Dmitriev - Commander of Platoon of the 37th Separate Guards Motor Rifle Brigade;
  • Sergey Sazanov - Wagner member;
  • Sergey Sazonov - the driver of the command and staff vehicle section of Wagner Private Military Company;
  • Alexandr Stupnitskyi — a reconnaissance and communications officer of the 1st Reconnaissance and Assault Platoon of the 1st Reconnaissance and Assault Company of Wagner Private Military Company.

Murders in Kyiv Oblast

On April 2, the Ukrainian Defence Ministry announced that the entire Kyiv Oblast had been liberated from the Russian troops. In particular, on March 28, the Ukrainian military completely took control of Irpin, and on March 31, they regained control over Bucha and Bucha hromada.

Evidence of mass killings of civilians is still being found in the liberated territories: journalists and government officials are publishing videos and photos of the victims, whose bodies were lying in the streets.

As of May 4, law enforcement officers have identified 1,235 people killed in Kyiv Oblast. 282 dead have not been identified yet. Most people died from firearms.