UARU
Authoritarianism Presenting Itself As The New Face Of Democracy — Political Scientist
10 October, 2016

What You Need To Know:

✅ “Part of the authoritarian rise that you see in the last 2-3 years is the result of the backlash of some of the protest movements;”
✅ While no country presents itself as authoritarian, Krastev says that most claim to be majoritarian democracies;
✅ “It’s not so much now that authoritarianism comes as an alternative to democracy. Authoritarianism is presenting itself as the new face of democracy;”
✅ Only pressure from below can change corruption.

“Part of the authoritarian rise that you see in the last 2-3 years is the result of the backlash of some of the protest movements,” explains Ivan Krastev, political scientist. With a rise in anti-institutional thinking and protest movements around the world, Krastev argues that leaders of various countries have managed to mobilize and polarize society.

While no country presents itself as authoritarian, Krastev says that most claim to be majoritarian democracies, with the majority being embodied in the figure of the leader. “It’s not so much now that authoritarianism comes as an alternative to democracy. 

Authoritarianism is presenting itself as the new face of democracy.”
With the rise of corruption as a global phenomenon, Krastev says that back in the 1970s, the only way for multinationals to enter foreign markets was through corruption. “Now with free trade, manymulti nationals perceive corruption as a hidden form of protectionism. When it comes to corruption, it’s not the biggest bribe that wins.” 

Krastev argues that only pressure from below can change corruption.

Hromadske's Volodymyr Yermolenko spoke to Ivan Krastev, Political Scientist on September 17, 2016 in Kyiv.