UARU
Attempted Murder Of Plotnitsky Indicates There Is An Internal Conflict Among The Separatists
8 August, 2016
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What You Need To Know:

✅ It is necessary to find out if it was in fact an murder attempt or if it was staged: “What’s going on there is not transparent: the separatists can organize different provocations to get an effect in the media;”

✅ Plotnitsky, a low ranking official of the Luhansk region took the separatist side when the war began in 2014;

✅ Despite a seeming unity and friendship between the so-called Luhansk and Donetsk People’s Republics, de-facto, there is an economic war between the two;

✅ “It’s not a functioning state, no matter how hard the separatists try to make it seem like one.”

Igor Plotnitsky, the so-called leader of the Luhansk People’s Republic was wounded in a car bombing in the regional capital of Luhansk in what many have called an assassination attempt. According to Andrey Dihtjarenko, a journalist with Radio Svoboda, it is necessary to find out if it was in fact an murder attempt or if it was staged: “What’s going on there is not transparent: the separatists can organize different provocations to get an effect in the media.”

Plotnitsky, a low ranking official of the Luhansk region took the separatist side when the war began in 2014. Being one of the few militants who remained in Luhansk when word broke out that Ukraine would attempt to reclaim the territory, he was rewarded with the leadership role.

Dihtjarenko says that despite a seeming unity and friendship between the so-called Luhansk and Donetsk People’s Republics, de-facto, there is an economic war between the two. “There is an internal conflict between the separatists; it’s like a war of everyone against everyone,” he says adding that Plotnitsky is at war with the oligarchs that control the energy market of those territories. Recently, custom offices have appeared on the border between the two republics.

Some speculate that the Kremlin is getting rid of the most notorious leaders of the separatist organizations and that Plotnitsky and Zacharchenko (the leader of the Donetsk People’s Republic) can be replaced with people who aren’t associated with the war of 2014.

“It’s not a functioning state, no matter how hard the separatists try to make it seem like one,” adds Dihtjarenko.

Hromadske’s Nataliya Gumenyuk spoke to Andrey Dihtjarenko, a journalist with Radio Svoboda on August 7th, 2016 in Kyiv.

Translated by Olga Kuchmagra.